Сommon raccoon

The raccoon, sometimes called the common raccoon to distinguish it from other species, is a medium-sized mammal native to North America. It is the largest of the procyonid family, having a body length of 40 to 70 cm (16 to 28 in), and a body weight of 5 to 26 kg (11 to 57 lb). Its grayish coat mostly consists of dense underfur, which insulates it against cold weather. Three of the raccoon's most distinctive features are its extremely dexterous front paws, its facial mask, and its ringed tail, which are themes in the mythologies of the indigenous peoples of the Americas relating to the animal. These ring-tailed animals are equally opportunistic when it comes to choosing a denying site. They may inhabit a tree hole, fallen log, or a house's attic. Females have one to seven cubs in early summer.

Interesting facts:

The raccoon is noted for its intelligence, as studies show that it is able to remember the solution to tasks for at least three years.

It is usually nocturnal and omnivorous, eating about 40% invertebrates, 33% plants, and 27% vertebrates.